Tuesday, August 18, 2009

Tigger melon trials

Stunted tigger melons

Given the wet, cool weather earlier on, I wasn't expecting much success with these tigger melons. I had read that they are particularly susceptible to powdery mildew, and that the best conditions for growing them was sun and heat. Tiggers are said to reach about a pound in weight but the one on the right was barely 4 ounces!

Tastewise...oh brother. I snipped these off the vine because their perfume fragrance was so sweet! Unfortunately, that did not extend to its flavor - bland as bland can be - but then again, they weren't matured to an ideal size/weight. Next year I'm growing these in the ground instead of containers. And I'll pray for reliable spring weather...

11 comments:

  1. Maybe they weren't tasty but they sure were prety! :-)

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  2. My thoughts exactly as gintoinio...look so cute..better luck next time...:-)

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  3. I love their orange color. Beautiful. Can't wait to see next years' photos.

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  4. Oh, these tiny melons!!

    My host family in Hungary always use them (also the green ones) to make pickled melons, I miss my host family crazily now.

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  5. Those are adorable. They look like little planets.

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  6. Gintoino, Anne - they certainly do live up to their cute "Tigger" image that's for sure!

    Amber - certainly something that kids would love to grow. With a name like Tigger it's just irresistable.

    KennyT - you da man! Thank you for sharing that tip! I'll keep that in mind in the event next year's crop turns out the same.

    Fern - now that makes me feel much better about the whole thing. ^-^ Next year I aim to grow bigger, sweeter orange planets! Ha!

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  7. Honey, I've grown them in the best conditions, and listen to me: they suck. Yes, they're beautiful, yes, they smell amazing, but they will refuse to taste good.

    I know. I've given them more than one shot. Even Baker Creek calls them "semisweet" which is their marketing-speak for tasteless.

    But, they're just so pretty.

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  8. they are so pretty, too bad not sweet :(

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  9. Christina - thank you for sharing your wisdom! I still remember the Melon Analysis, and trusted in every word that you wrote! I won't be putting too much hope into next year's trials, but I'm one of those who just can't stand to let anything go to waste - seeds included. If anything, the Tiggers of next year will be allowed a spot to roam and brighten up the garden.

    Kat - hehe...if I had known how bland they would be, I'd have let Mr B have at 'em earlier on!

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  10. I gave these little tigger melons a try with no luck in ripening, but I did have luck with Blacktail Mountain Watermelon in our cool climate. If it will grow in Idaho and Washington, there's a good chance it may grow for you.

    Here's a link to the photos: http://tallcloverfarm.com/?p=141

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  11. Tom - thank you so much for sharing this with me! I am ready to gamble again with ordering seeds online (my last shipment was confiscated because I had too many packets???). I loved your post so much that I had to insert a direct link.

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