Thursday, December 10, 2009

Corbezzolo / Strawberry Tree

CorbezzoloI haven't forgotten about this gardening blog, but considering the current state of the vegetable patch itself, there is not much going on to share on these pages. I knew that I wouldn't have much of an interest for a winter garden during the holiday season, which in a way gives me something to really look forward to come next spring's planting season! Only two more months and I get to start tomato seedlings!!

Nevertheless, I'll continue to share what I come across by way of fruits, vegetables, flowers and plants that might be of some interest. This strawberry tree immediately caught my eye at an italian farmstay (agriturismo) that we lodged at in the region of Friuli. Known as corbezzolo, the proprietor said that it is easy to maintain, and keeps it in a shrub style as shown below. We got to taste some of the fruit baked within a breakfast torte and it really has no particular flavor. Wikipedia notes that in the symbol of Madrid, it is a strawberry tree that the bear is leaning up against.

Strawberry tree

Today's average: 13°C / 55°F

9 comments:

  1. I've seen this here, and the fruit gets deep red, I think they call it "yamamomo" (mountain peach).

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  2. It grows beautifully around here as well. It is in the heath family, a fact recognizable by its bell-shaped, honey-scented flowers. The redder the fruit are, the tastier they are, but they certainly don't compare to true strawberries.

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  3. Kat - from outer appearances the yamamomo and corbezzolo look like they could be distant cousins, but I checked the english link and noted that the mountain peach has one single seed with a diameter about half that of the fruit. The corbezzolo has tiny, tiny seeds. Idea! I'll update with a photo of the inside!

    Thanks for sharing that link though, because the yamamomo sounds much more tasty!

    Christina - ha! Would you believe that we were encouraged to pick some of the fruit? I think the owner wanted someone, anyone, to make use of the fruit and not let anything go to waste. It's the same thing with persimmons...LOADS on everyone's trees but nobody wants them!

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  4. thanks for checking it all out :)

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  5. Looks to be a beautiful tree ... new to me ... lovely blossoms and fruit.

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  6. They're lovely at this time of the year, aren't they? When I was a child living in north Africa I used to think they looked like decorated Christmas trees. I've always called them Arbutus. It's the same here, people don't eat these fruit, or persimmons either!

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  7. Chaiselongue - we are going to see if we can locate one at a nursery here. I really do love the festive look that it gives!

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  8. Rowena, wishing u a merry X'mas and New Year !

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  9. These grow well in Liguria, as well. When really ripe they're rather sweet, but the texture is kind of mushy. I don't know anyone who actually uses them for anything. The fruit looks to me like it comes from outer space - so funny - sort of the brussels sprouts of the fruit tree world. (Tomatillos are another vegetable 'alien'...)

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